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Energy Economics and Engineering Specialization

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The specialization in Energy Economics and Engineering brings together faculty and students from various personal and academic backgrounds to focus on potential careers in energy-related technology, management, and public policy. Course work explores current and evolving energy systems.

Faculty involved and related projects:

Lynden Archer 
James A. Friend Family Distinguished Professor 

Alfred  Center      
Professor of Practice and Assoc. Director of the M.Eng. Program

Prof. Paulette Clancy's laboratory is one of the leading groups in the country studying atomic- and molecular-scale modeling of semiconductor materials. Her team focuses on prediction and insight regarding the link between material design and properties, allowing them to suggest processing conditions and tailored materials to fulfill a desired set of constraints. Her primary current foci are novel materials for (1) Photovoltaic applications of solar cells and (2) Laser annealing of semiconductors and porous low-k materials. 

Prof. Tobias Hanrath's research efforts focus on the fundamental study of optoelectronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals. This work is inspired by the potential application of these materials in solar energy conversion and energy storage devices. The semiconductor nanocrystals used in this work provide a diverse set of building blocks whose electronic and optical properties differ from their bulk counterparts due to the spatial wavefunction confinement. 

Prof. Yong Joo's group has laid a foundation for the utilization of water-based, gas-assisted electrospinning in the development of nanomaterials for energy storage devices. Their current research focuses on (1) Si-rich carbon nanofibers for Li-ion battery anodes, (2) Nanocomposite nanofibers for LIB separators, and (3) Metal oxide nanofibers for Li-air battery cathodes. 

Prof. Frank Lomax’s technical focus is on production of synthesis gas and derivative chemicals, adsorption and membrane purification of gases, hydrogen transportation and use, plant design & construction and formal process safety analysis.

Muqtadar Quraishi
Lecturer and Principle Instructor Energy Economics, Energy Engineering, Energy Supply Chain. Energy Policy

Prof. Jefferson Tester's laboratory focuses on three areas: (1) Energy/ Resource Related Problems, such as heat mining processes for geothermal energy extraction and gas hydrates for methane recovery; (2) Environmental, related to destruction of hazardous chemicals in supercritical water, aquifer contamination from migration of wastes, and carbon dioxide capture and sequestration; and (3) Applied Thermodynamics and Kinetics, as in chemical kinetics in supercritical fluids, molecular simulations of condensed matter, properties of aqueous organic and electrolyte mixtures at high temperatures and pressures, and rock-water interactions in hydrothermal environments. 

Prof. Fengqi You's group focuses on process, energy, and environmental systems engineering. Particular research interests lie in (1) Sustainable design and synthesis of energy systems, including biofuels processes, photovoltaics, carbon capture and separation, and shale gas, (2) Systems analysis, modeling and optimization for the water-energy nexus, (3) Sustainable manufacturing, sustainable operations (planning and scheduling) and control of advanced manufacturing systems, (4) Life cycle analysis and optimization of energy, environmental and economic systems, (5) Enterprise-wide supply chain and inventory optimization under uncertainty, and (6) Sustainability analysis of nanotechnology and advanced materials.

Michael Weill                       

A.N. Other

Related courses include:

  • ChemE 664 Energy Economics (fall)
  • ChemE 6641 Energy Value Chain (fall)
  • ChemE 6642 Energy Policy (spring
  • ChemE 665 Energy Engineering (spring)
  • CHEME 6661  Bioenergy and Biofuels (spring)
  • CHEME 6662  Solar Energy (spring)
  • CHEME 6663  Geothermal Energy (fall)
  • CHEME 6664  Wind Energy (Hydrokinetic and Aerodynamic) (fall)
  • CHEME 6666  Unconventional Fossil Resources from Shale Gas Formations (spring)
  • CHEME 6667  Transportation Energy Systems (spring)
  • CHEME 6671  Nuclear Energy Module (spring)
  • CHEME 6672  Electrical Power System Module (fall)
  • CHEME 6678  Water- Energy Nexus (fall)
The specialization in Energy Economics and Engineering brings together faculty and students from various personal and academic backgrounds to focus on potential careers in energy-related technology, management, and public policy. This example curriculum satisfies the chemical engineering M.Eng. requirements and the specialization requirements

Fall

Spring
CHEME 6660 Analysis of Sustainable Systems 3 CHEME 6650 Energy Engineering 3
CHEME 6640 Energy Economics 3 CHEME 6642 Energy Policy 1
  Required Elective3 3   Required Elective 3 3
 CHEME 6641 Energy Value Chain 1   Required Elective 3 3
CHEME 666_ Single Credit Modules in conjunction with 66604 2   Free Elective6 2-3
Business Elective5   3   Business Elective (can also be taken in the spring semester)  
      CHEME 5650 Energy-related M.Eng. Project 1-9 Credits
(Variable)
    15     15

1Minimum total credits to be 30

2At least 12 of these credits, not including credits earned for the M. Eng. project (more than three credits), must be earned in chemical   engineering courses.

3Required Electives: (Economic and Societal Impact, Environmental Impact, Energy Technology).  A minimum of 3 credits in each of the three broad categories outlined below.  Required electives: 666_ one credit modules taught in Spring/Fall and not taken as part of the 2 credits below can also be considered as Energy Technology Electives.

4 Two modules (each of 1 credit) to be taken in conjunction with CHEME 6660.  Select from the following:

  • CHEME 6661  Bioenergy and Biofuels (spring)
  • CHEME 6662  Solar Energy (spring)
  • CHEME 6663  Geothermal Energy (fall)
  • CHEME 6664  Wind Energy (Hydrokinetic and Aerodynamic) (fall)
  • CHEME 6666  Unconventional Fossil Resources from Shale Gas Formations (spring)
  • CHEME 6667  Transportation Energy Systems (spring)
  • CHEME 6671  Nuclear Energy Module (spring)
  • CHEME 6672  Electrical Power System Module (fall)
  • CHEME 667X Energy Storage (spring)
  • CHEME 6678  Water- Energy Nexus (fall)

5Business Elective can be taken in either semester.  Only one business elective of 3 credits is required.  Recommended business electives:

  • CHEME 5720 Managing New Business Development (fall) 3 credits
  • CEE 5900 Project Management (spring) 3 credits
  • Any other course with the approval of the M.Eng. Director

6 Free elective(s) will be a requirement if the 30 credit criteria is not met.  It can be from any of the three sections (Economic and Societal Impact, Environmental and Energy Technology) or any other relevant area with the consent of the M.Eng. Director.

7Suggested Electives

Economic and Societal Impact Electives:
  • AEM 4150 Price Analysis (fall) 3 credits
  • AEM 4450 Toward a Sustainable Global Food System: Food Policy for Developing Countries (fall) 3 credits
  • AEM 4500 Resource Economics (fall) 3 credits
  • AEM 6080 Production Economics (fall) 3 credits
  • AEM 6510 Environmental and Resource Economics (spring) 4 credits
  • AEM 6580 Economics and Psychology of Sustainable Business (fall) 3 credits
  • AEM 7500 Resource Economics (fall) 3 credits
  • CEE 4920 Engineers for a Sustainable World (fall) 3 credits
  • CRP 5040 Urban Economics (spring) 3 credits
  • NBA 5245 Introduction to Macroeconomics (fall/spring) 3 credits
  • NBA 6030 Strategies for Sustainability (spring) 1.5 credits
  • PAM 3240 Risk Management and Policy (fall) 3 credits
  • PAM 5040 Public Finance: Economics of the Public Sector (spring) 4 credits
  • PAM 5470 Microeconomics for Management and Policy (spring) 4 credits
  • PAM 3130 Behavioral Economics and Public Policy (spring) 3 credits
  • PAM 3400 The Economics of Consumer Policy (spring) 4 credits
  • CHEME 6673 Tools for Analyzing Energy and Society (spring, alternate years) 1 credit

Environmental Impact Courses:

  • CHEME 6610 Air Pollution Control (spring) 3 credits
  • BEE 4870 Sustainable Bioenergy Systems (fall) 3 credits
  • EAS 4570 Atmospheric Air Pollution (fall) 3 credits
  • CEE 6200 Water Resources Systems Engineering (spring) 3 credits
  • BSOC 2061 Ethics and the Environment (fall) 4 credits
  • MAE 5010 Future Energy Systems (spring) 3 credits
  • AEM 4510 Future Energy Systems (spring) 3 credits
  • AEM 4390 Technology Strategy (spring) 2 credits
  • BEE 4750 Environmental System Analysis (fall) 3 credits
  • NBA 6030 Strategies For Sustainability (winter) 1.5 credits
Energy Technology Electives:

  • BEE 6880 Applied Modeling and Simulation for Renewable Energy Systems (spring) 3 credits
  • BEE 4010  Renewable Energy Systems (spring) 3 credits
  • EAS 4010 Fundamentals of Energy and Mineral Resources (fall) 3 credits
  • EAS 4340 Exploration Geophysics (fall) 3 credits
  • ECE 4510 Electric Power Systems I (fall) 4 credits
  • ECE 4520 Operation and Optimization of the Power Grid (spring) 4 credits
  • MAE 5010 Future Energy Systems (spring) 3 credits
  • MAE 4020 Wind Power (fall) 3 credits
  • MAE 4590  Introduction to Controlled Fusion: Principles and Technology (spring) 3 credits
  • MAE 5430 Combustion Processes (fall) 3 credits
  • MAE 6560 Nanoscale Energy Transport and Conversion (spring) 4 credits
  • MSE 5330 Materials for Energy Production, Storage, and Conversion (fall) 3 credits
  • CEE 4630  Future Transportation Technologies & Systems (fall) 3 credits
  • CHEME 4130 Introduction to Nuclear Science and Engineering (fall) 3 credits
  • CHEME 5207  Hydrocarbon Resources (spring) 2 credits
  • CHEME 5870/5880  Energy Seminar II (fall/spring) Only 1 credit will count
  • CHEME 6675  Energy Life Cycle Assessment Module (spring) 1credit.  One quarter term.
  • CHEME 6800 Computational Optimization (fall) 4 credits

Students are required to re-check course offerings in Cornell Courses of Study at the beginning of each semester.

Students who wish to fulfill an elective by taking a course that is not listed above should send the course title and description to the for approval M.Eng. Director before taking the course.