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Paulette Clancy and Julie Nucci win Cornell grant to Internationalize the Curriculum

Monday, March 30, 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cornell has a vibrant program to accelerate the internationalization of its undergraduate curriculum (ICC). Bodman Professor Paulette Clancy (Chem. & Biomolec. Engr.) and Dr. Julie Nucci (Mat. Sci. & Engr.) recently won an ICC grant to fund a collaboration that links Cornell's engineering students with Indian students on service projects related to renewable energy.

For details: 
http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/2015/03/internationalizing-cornell-curriculum-grants-awarded.

In India, the collaboration is headed by Samir Somaiya, a BS graduate of the School of Chemical Engineering at Cornell, whose family founded the Somaiya Vidyavihar educational institutions. Additional funds have been committed by the department of Materials Science and Engineering and the School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Cornell.

The program builds on Clancy and Nucci's existing program, part of an NSF GK12 PhD training grant, that enabled PhD students and local K-12 teachers to experience renewable energy projects in India. This new ICC grant will develop an educational case study that is related to renewable energy systems. The case study will illustrate the connection between thermodynamics and the practical design of real-life energy systems. These case studies will be deployed in required Engineering courses in such a way as to promote interaction between teams of undergraduates in India and at Cornell to share design ideas. A small group of undergraduate students from the Cornell classes, typically six students, will be sponsored to enrich their classroom experience through a visit to Somaiya Vidyavihar educational institutions in India. The

7-10 day trip to India will involve visiting two sites, one in an urban and one in a rural setting. They will be actively involved in hands-on projects related to low-cost energy generation. Collaboration with the Indian sites will allow students to appreciate cultural differences in the context of shared goals related to energy generation technologies.

This project is aimed at promoting the sustainability efforts of a rural village in India by hands-on involvement in energy-related service projects. The first such project will involve the design and fabrication of a biodigester.

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